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mpeafree

Full Spectrum LED Lighting

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Hi all, I disappeared for a while. I'm back, do not know for how long...

 

Some time back I began researching possible alternatives to flourescent full spectrum lighting and have since been working with a company in germany who now produce full spectrum daylight LED's at very competitive costs.

 

There are clear advantages with LED lighting, the two foremost being longevity of the bulb and running costs. The biggest disadvantage was the initial purchase cost which generally tended to put people off, especially if they are skeptical about the stated longevity of the LED which in most cases amounts to tens of years as opposed to a few years with flourescent or incandescent lighting. The other critical point worth mentioning is that flourescent full spectrum lighting must be replaced yearly, the new full spectrum daylight bulbs will last at least your lifetime if not your birds lifetime.

 

I hope this helps a lot of people provide 'real' light for their companions.

 

http://www.lifelite.de/english/vollspektrum_led.php

 

Michael

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Ill... yes, but i'm coping, thank you for asking.

 

I picked up swine flu just before christmas and this was complicated by bronchitis (I am a smoker, have no sympathy for me) which for the last two or three weeks has hovered around the edges of pluerisy. I have just completed an antibiotic course and kept well wrapped up if going out was necessary so with some smiling providence I should get better...

 

:)

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Hi MP,

I had a look at the LifeLite website you mentioned.  But do you have any details of the spectral quality of the leds; and any info on flicker rates of them? 

 

Can birds percieve flicker in leds as they can in flourescent lighting? 

 

It would be good to see graphs showing spectral quality of leds compared with normal daylight (of 6000 degrees K).    Have you come across a site showing this yet? 

 

Thanks,

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Greg, as far as I am aware and I have had a great deal of experience with LED lighting they do not 'flicker' like a flourescent and the only LED's that do are those in cycle lights etc for reasons of safety. Because of the extremely low voltage and current required to run an LED it is a relative simple affair to construct drivers that produce a pure DC current for them in spite of the 50hz alternating current their 'drivers' and ultimately they are fed from.

 

It is also possible to construct a stabilised power supply relatively inexpensively that will produce a stable 5vcc+ from as wide a current variation as that between 1.2volts and 36volts, also many of the LED replacement lighting sold on the current market is useable in the range of 80volts AC to 260volts AC so it seems unlikely that the mains 'cycling' AC will affect the final drive current and voltage which of course ultimately affects the light being produced by the LED themselves.

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The major difference between LED lighting and all other types of 'mains ac' lighting is that they require a stable DC current which by it's very nature is non-flicker, only by introducing flicker (as in cycle lights) can you get an LED to flicker. The question remains why would you want to?

 

Mains AC lighting flickers because it is an alternating current AND because the very design of many of them require an alternating 'spike' to strike the gas in the tube. Even incandescent 'filament' bulbs 'flicker' it's just that the element remains hot enough to make it not noticeable.

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Hi Mp,

Thanks for that.  I know there can be issues with flourescent tubes as the flicker in them can be detected by birds and  may appear to them as a strobe effect. 

 

But I myself get a flicker effect when driving behind cars at night whose lights are leds.  As I look away from the tail lights, there is a flicker effect, which I never get with the old conventional bulbs.  I'll ask LifeLite about this and see if they can also give info on spectral quality of their daylight leds. 

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Greg, do you suffer migraines? Just curious because I see the same thing whenever there is any device that does not have a stable light output. The other thing is that on cars the current is not very well stabilised for the lighting and auxilliaries so there may be some residual 'spikes' from the alternator.

 

Yes, please do ask them, the more people that question them about the spectral output and if it does indeed contain the requisite UVA and UVB wavelengths the more interest they will take in their product being exactly what they say it is.

 

I orginally approached them a year ago and what you see now on their site is the result of my pressure on them to produce LED daylight. Then my concerns addressed the safety of using mercury in the flourescents. Reading the health and safety guidlines if you break a compact flourescent in your home you must open all windows, collect all broken pieces with a dustpan and brush (not a vacuum cleaner) and dispose of at a hazardous materials recyclying plant.

 

http://www.treehugger.com/interior-design/bbc-on-safe-disposal-of-cfls.html

 

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Reptle lighting should NOT under any circumstances be used for birds. The UV output and bandwidth is different and much more harsh for reptiles because they live IN the sunshine.

 

Parrots even in the wild live in the forest canopy where it is cool and humid.

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Hi Mp,

That's great that you were able to influence the makers and get them sussed out re birds' needs. 

 

And funny that you spotted I get migraines; yes I do!  I get blind spots, and a range of visual effects as well.  These are usually followed by severe headaches and nausea, which last for several hours.  So, are those more able to see flicker more susceptable to migraines...? 

 

Re. reptiles needs.  I understand that *different* reptiles have different needs.  There would be a huge difference between say, a snake living in a tropical dessert and an arboreal lizard in a temperate zone I would think.  So, you'd need to have details of the species' adaptations/nat. env.  to know what  type of lighting it needs.  Reps are probably more critical re. this issue than birds aren't they? 

 

But yes, having watched various tropical parrots in South America, they seem to hate staying in sunlight for any length of time, and dive beneath the leaves into the shade once they alight in a tree. 

 

 

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Reptle lighting should NOT under any circumstances be used for birds. The UV output and bandwidth is different and much more harsh for reptiles because they live IN the sunshine.

Of course not! Reptile bulbs are dangerous for use on birds,  but new tech is often taken up by the herpers sooner so they will give you a better idea about the quality of light, lifespan etc.

 

 

Re. reptiles needs.  I understand that *different* reptiles have different needs.  There would be a huge difference between say, a snake living in a tropical dessert and an arboreal lizard in a temperate zone I would think.  So, you'd need to have details of the species' adaptations/nat. env.  to know what  type of lighting it needs.  Reps are probably more critical re. this issue than birds aren't they? 

 

Yeah the companies usually produce 3 (for reptiles) output levels 2%,5%,10% and one makes a 12+% model (measure of UVB output). More important in reptiles because the actual UVB has a greater effect on behaviour, and many species can't really survive without the UVB.

 

Reptile bulbs tend to be brighter and have been linked to cataracts.

 

However a great deal of reptile keepers, are very knowledgeable about how to check and test you are getting what you need to be from lighting.

 

Sorry for any confusion caused.

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Yes Greg,

 

It's all related to your brain's "CPU" speed for want of a better term.

 

People's brains process information at different speeds and broadly speaking the individual with the faster mental process can 'see' or rather 'percieve' light differently especially if it has 'flicker'. If you have an old style CRT tv or computer monitor you can test this with the monitor refresh rate set at 50hz then turn your head to one side from the other quickly (but not so quickly as to cause physical discomfort) and those who are susceptible to stress or tension headaches will percieve the flicker on the CRT as it 'compiles' the video image.

 

If you are affected by a 'faster brain speed' you will see two halves of a picture on the screen and in some cases (extremely rare) some people can see a different top half picture relative to the bottom half picture particularly in scene changes.

 

Birds brains process information far more quickly than most other animals because they fly, faster motive speed requires much faster reactions to avoid flying into things or other birds. You never see birds have mid air collisions no matter how closely they fly together.

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