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David

How was your year?

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As the summer season comes to an end I wondered how fellow breeders had done?

In the past 12 months 70% of our breeding*pairs have laid eggs (but of these 30% hatched chicks which did not survive). However only 25% have reared chicks so far. 20% have laid infertile eggs.

 

*pairs which are adult and compatible.

 

I should add that I operate a very "hands-off"system with minimal nest-box interference and do not HR.

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Hi, about 50% of mine have breed this year.

Spectacled parrotletsx1, mountain parakeetsx2, GMR x3, Peached faced lovebirds x9,

Cockatiels on eggs. Our plumheads will be ready to breed next year. and the rest no joy :(

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hiya sorry to introod into this thread (as i am not a breeder with a success rate) but can i ask Greg, is not morally wrong to give your parrot her (would be) babies back to eat? i feel a bit sick even thinking about it!!! but as i said i have no experience of breeding birds and just wondered if this was normal practice? also you may have stopped 7 "unwanted" babies becoming born, but you may have also stopped 7 very much wanted and loved babies becoming born or maybe i just have rose coloured glasses on lol

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The practice of boiling eggs means:The fresh eggs are boiled prior to any sign of an embryo (before 3 days of incubation)then the whole egg with the shell on is placed back under the bird so she can sit on them.This prevents the female from laying but the eggs will not hatch.They do not/should not eat the eggs.The right or wrongs of doing this would be subject to much heated debate,on a personal level I would not prevent a bird from breeding.On a legal basis I suspect this prevention of natural behaviour may contravene the Animal Welfare Bill,this is the new law championed by Mr Greg Glendell.

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also, not a breeder myself, but didn't Greg mean that he gave the eggs back for his parrots to sit on? meaning that the mother didn't think her egges had been stolen, but that they just wouldn't hatch?

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Greys 12 chicks out of 15 eggs 3 clear .

Maxi Pionus 3 out of 3

Sennies 6 out of 6

Yellow crowns 0 out of 4

Blue head pionus 0 out of 0

 

Agree with Mike on the G/G blunder shot himself in the foot there i think .

 

The fresh eggs are boiled prior to any sign of an embryo (before 3 days of incubation)

So if G/G left her to lay a clutch before he boiled them there would of been embrio's developing

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Guest Mark1971

 

Agree with Mike on the G/G blunder shot himself in the foot there i think .

 

The fresh eggs are boiled prior to any sign of an embryo (before 3 days of incubation)

So if G/G left her to lay a clutch before he boiled them there would of been embrio's developing

I hate everything this Greg person says anyway, why let the birds nest if he does that every time?

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Agree with Mike on the G/G blunder shot himself in the foot there i think .

 

The fresh eggs are boiled prior to any sign of an embryo (before 3 days of incubation)

So if G/G left her to lay a clutch before he boiled them there would of been embrio's developing

I hate everything this Greg person says anyway, why let the birds nest if he does that every time?

Agree

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Seems like GG has provided the stimulus ie a nestbox to breed in and then removed eggs probably piecemeal.I wish my Blue fornts would lay seven eggs.I think this many proves he has been taken them which is bad for the hen.Removal stimulates replacement does't it?

The right to a fulfilled existence doesn't involve hard boiling your potential offspring

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At risk of hijacking my own thread(!), many single female parrots, without partners or mates or any other "stimulus"(such as a nest box) will lay eggs, often repeatedly.

It was suggested to me by one of the best parrot breeders in the UK that most bird-keepers actually prevent birds from breeding as a result of poor husbandry. His argument was that breeding is a strong natural urge and if captive birds fail then it is the keepers that are preventing them from breeding. If you extend this argument then many bird keepers are preventing birds from expressing natural behaviour through sheer incompetence and could be accused of infringing the AWB.

Given that GG has decided not to allow his birds to breed(another debate) then his method seems pretty reasonable.

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Hijack away,its your site and your thread but I feel the response you got from Greg Glendel hijacked it before anyone else commented.He jumped on a perfectly valid thread to preach to us yet again about the need to cull at every opportunity all those unwanted birds!!!!!!!!!

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In principal I can't see how you can demonstrate that any bird kept in captivity is "able to express it's natural behaviour" Surely in can only do so if in the wild ? However I am being provocative and I guess some legistlation is required to ensure some basic minimum standards of care are provided. Just don't like the implied reasoning very much. Afterall the proposed standards are a long way from keeping them "free range"

 

But getting back to the thread, I had a reasonable year really, could have been better. The cold weather in the Midlands early in the year caused me problems and it initially resulted in a slow start for the Caiques. And sadly even lost a couple of Eclectus chicks in the nest box which hatched out in January :( Also one of the breeding Caique ***** died but luckily the hen took immediately to a new mate and they had chicks after 3 months :) Since the Spring everything has been about normal, the only disapointment being the loss of the Ruppells chick and not having any success with the Red Bellied parrots again. Over the next weeks I am moving these poicephalus parrots to their own area to see if they perform better away from the Caiques.

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Not too bad really. Very good fertility rate overall.

BHC 2 prs laid 11 eggs, hatched 10. 2 died, h/r 4 and p/r 4.

YTC p/r 4, lost 7 in bad Winter.

GTC laid 4, fostered 3 under Hahns, 3 hatched, 2 died, h/r 1.

Hahns p/r 3, h/r 1.

Capes 2 prs, p/r 2 each.

Severe Macaws, 2 prs p/r 4.

YC Macaws, clear again.

Brown Headed Parrots, nothing yet.

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Not a breeder, but let my black headed caiques play nesting and they managed to lay eggs and raise a baby chick till he/she fledged :D . Not sure of the moral compass of the whole thing, and the female caique has become very aggressive but they do seem happy to have raised their baby.

 

On Gregs comment - can't you buy little ceramic eggs that the hen can sit on? The whole boiling up of the actual eggs seems a little morbid - the eggs that didn't hatch for my caiques were given a decent burial :oops: .

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Hi folks,

Been away; doing parroty things!

I am aware of the great number of unwanted birds; and more being produced each year. I am offered them every week and try to find good homes for them or re-direct callers to good places themselves. I used to breed (Amazons and greys) but have not done so for many years. Any birds I've bred are fostered out, I've never sold a bird in my life, and own all birds I've ever bred. Still, it was learning curve stuff and until the 'unwanted' birds all have good caring homes, breeding is counter productive to parrot welfare.

 

My Amazons were given to me as unwanted; two of the females will lay each year. One lays fertile eggs, as she came with her 'mate'. I do not 'encourage breeding' they do not have nestboxes, but I cannot stop them laying. At the sight of the first egg, I hard-boil it and giving it back to her to 'incubate'. Birds have a behavioural repertoire to cope with 'failed' eggs, and desert after the incubation period (about 28 days). Yes, I also use dummy eggs (racing pigeons) as this can sometimes induce her to think she has a full clutch (4 -5 eggs) and stops her laying more, but this does not always work.

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I think many breeders are far more aware these days of a need to parent rear and the consequences of hand rearing some of the more common species. Most of the breeders i know personally are keeping the rarer birds and parent rearing where possible. I think weve had enough of having it preached to us .

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My Ruppells have finally succeeded; I am handraising four chicks now. The youngest died at about 1 week old; the others are about 1 month old now and are very very quiet - but quite active and flappy.

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