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cw_lilstar

bird fancier’s lung

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Hypersensitivity pneumonitis (also called extrinsic allergic alveolitis, EAA) is an inflammation of the alveoli within the lung caused by hypersensitivity to inhaled organic dusts. Sufferers are commonly exposed to the dust by their occupation or hobbies.

 

That is so sad to read about someone so young who has this in its chronic form.

It is an awful disease, as is any lung disease, and not something to be taken lightly.

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It is not just parrots that cause this, as your title says Pigeons, even poultry. Just about any bird kept in confined air.

It is also known under a lot of different names depending on the antigen that causes it, a lot of organic spores can trigger a reaction.

Thankfully I dont think it is too common.

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From the article in your link

hypersensitivity pneumonitis, more commonly known as bird fancier’s lung, which was triggered by dust from her pet cockatiel’s droppings which wafted into the air

It is a hypersensitivity disorder, an allergy. A little or a lot, it would not matter.

My thoughts on avoiding problems from the dust are good hygiene, cleaning up the poos before they dry, and changing cage bedding daily. Also the use of good air purifiers and good ventilation. Our windows are always open when possible, not just for our sakes but the birds aswell.

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Awful darn condition. Poor girl.

As much fresh air through your houses without causing draughts to chill your birds is a must I believe and also cleaning up poops as soon as you can.

Despite these measures I still became ill - some people are just more sensitive than others.

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I would have thought that cleaning up out-of-cage poop by wiping with a damp cloth will eliminate dust particles from becoming airborne. Also anyone with more than one bird or birds with lots of dander such as toos and greys would need to take extra care. Birds that bathe can also help with excess dander.

 

Thanks for bringing this to our attention cw_lilstar. Thought provoking thread.

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Someone in Birdtalk magazine suggested before you clean up poos and newspapers, try squirting them with a squirter like the ones we use for giving birds showers, but with the nozzle set on fine mist. It doesn't make a mess and keeps the dust from flying about as you deal with the mess.

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I did all of the above, wet the dry poos before cleaning out, I had 2 expensive filters and in the end all the cleaning out was left to hubby. I still became very ill, there is no possible way to eliminate every single spore, birds moult and the feather shaft flakes.. I would have done anything to keep my birds but it was only possible if I was prepared to die for them and they'd have needed rehoming anyway and I'd have had no say where they went. I truly believe if someone has this disease then it's a matter of how long it takes them to become ill and not a case of "if" they become ill. I was lucky that my reactions were so extreme, if it had just been the odd bout of breathlessness I might have let it go on until the damage was too severe to have any kind of life.

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I did all of the above, wet the dry poos before cleaning out, I had 2 expensive filters and in the end all the cleaning out was left to hubby. I still became very ill, there is no possible way to eliminate every single spore, birds moult and the feather shaft flakes.. I would have done anything to keep my birds but it was only possible if I was prepared to die for them and they'd have needed rehoming anyway and I'd have had no say where they went. I truly believe if someone has this disease then it's a matter of how long it takes them to become ill and not a case of "if" they become ill. I was lucky that my reactions were so extreme, if it had just been the odd bout of breathlessness I might have let it go on until the damage was too severe to have any kind of life.

Sorry if it read that way Karen, :oops: i wasnt meaning to say that if you had AA that it was possible to eliminate the cause by these precautions.

These are just general precautions that we should all take as fine dust in any form is not good for our lungs and could cause or aggravate longer term problems

I believe as you do that it is not a case of "if" you become ill. AA is taken too lightly in many cases and the belief that eliminating some birds in a household and trying to keep others is not an option if you are affected.

 

Paul

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Nooo Paul I know you didn't mean that *hugs* You're right about needing to ventilate and clean as much as possible, I think that's needed for general health let alone for ppl with allergies.

 

Karen xx

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Allergies usually take a while to develop. They don't generally occur on first exposure to the 'allergen' (substance causing allergy) and it is possible to have parrots for years before it suddendly develops. I took penicillin many times before it brought me up in red lumps everywhere. Trouble with this allergic reaction is that severe lung damage can occur - but it is rare.

 

(Hi Kerenza - good to see you are still here - on parrot-link I mean!)

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