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NoZ

Need help urgently!

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Guest ramagel

Is it bleeding? if yes, there'll be info in the infotopic section. Fine flour can help staunch the bleeding: cornflour, arrowroot. If you can't stop the bleeding then YES immediate veterinary attention is necessary. Needn't be an avian vet if it's a real emergency and they're not available or too far away - any vet should have a way of stopping bleeding.

 

If it's not bleeding then *I* wouldn't necessarily consider it an emergency (but much depends on the nature of the 'wound'): I'd call my vet tomorrow if it still looked 'icky'.

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It's not bleeding, but what I think is the vein maybe, is exposed. So now there is a red tip on his nail. Maybe it just looks worse than it is, he's still singing away like nothing happened.

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Guest ramagel

Well, under those circumstances - all things being equal - I would not be making a dash to the vet just yet. I'd make sure I had his number handy in case - for example - the bird catches it and does cause it to bleed. But birds seem to heal quite quickly - they have to in the wild or they're dead.

 

If the balance of advice you get though is 'go to the vet' and you think that's the best thing, then obviously go.

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Guest ramagel

Yes: that's pretty much par for the course I'm afraid. Persevere, but not for too long if it's still bleeding and certainly not if it's bleeding heavily. I use a heck of a lot of flour trying to get it onto the wound: more goes on the floor than on the wound, but it doesn't need much to stop it. Then keep the bird quiet until it all coagulates.

 

Sometimes I put flour into a bowl and get the bird's foot in the bowl on way or another. Sometimes I hold the bird and dump flour on the wound (and my lap). Whatever works.

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Please call your vet - even if you can completely stop the bleeding now there is still a high risk of infection and further bleeding later on (birds aren't very good at keeping quiet and still and have a habit of dislodging clots on toe ends). Not only this but exposure of the soft tissue underneath the nail is VERY painful and I would not be happy leaving him without pain relief and a proper discussion by phone, then a vet examination if necessary.

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The bleeding has stopped again. Our closest avian vet is 50 miles away, so it isn' likely that we would be able to get there. He doesn't seem to be in any pain, he isn't limping. How likely is infection and is there any way to prevent it?

 

We have a vet about 5 minutes away that we could go to.

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Could you maybe ring an avian vet and ask them if, in their opinion, a non-avian vet could treat your bird?

 

Marie is a vet so I'd be inclined to at least speak to a vet after reading her post.

 

Best of luck! :)

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Guest ramagel

Oh crikey. I SAID I'd shut up. But the bleeding appears to have stopped. This doesn't seem to be a Sunday-afternoon-50-mile-drive emergency. It might be, but it doesn't seem to be.

 

There's a balance between taking the 'worst case scenario' and 'best possible advice' and a pragmatic view of the nature of the 'emergency'. Only you NoZ can decide. I have an Avian Vet 10 miles away: I would NOT be taking my bird there for an exposed nail quick with no bleeding or where the bleeding had stopped and where the injury is understood and first-aid has been successful.

 

I would keep an eye on the bird, obviously - any blood loss is significant in a small critter, but I would check with my vet tomorrow and if he said 'bring him in' I'd do it. But he'll be guided a great deal by what you say. If there's no sign of a problem he might just say "watch out for any signs of infection which are ...... and bring him in if you're worried".

 

Do vets give antibiotics prophylactically these days? If not, then I'm not sure what he could do* to prevent an infection that hasn't yet occurred.

 

Other folks may advise differently, and their advice might well be better.

 

*ionic/colloidal silver perhaps. But that's another interesting topic

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It is always a good idea to talk to your vet to make him/her aware of the injury and to get his/her advice, also if you are at all worried then always better safe than sorry.

But if the bleeding has stopped and he is showing no signs of pain, then he should be fine, just make sure all his perches and where ever he stands is clean (wash them with a little diluted miltons) the nail will very quickly form a covering.

 

If you think that you are not able to ensure it stays clean for next few days or he starts to limp/hold the foot up when not sleep or resting or it feels hotter than the other foot then he will need to see the vet for antibiotics to prevent any infection.

 

My baby Macaws "gloved" her nail a few weeks ago and it took hours and hours to stop all bleeding (just dripping from time to time) 3 days later and the nail was fine.

Bleeding acts to wash the nail and clotting stops infection getting in.

Taking the end of the nail off is no difference than when a vet cuts the nail a little to close to the soft underneath tissue and makes the nail bleed :lol:

 

Just looked at your PB if its a kakariki then they have a habit of laying on their backs with their feet in the air as if dead if they are hurt. :lol:

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Guest ramagel

Just looked at your PB if its a kakariki then they have a habit of laying on their backs with their feet in the air as if dead if they are hurt. :lol:

Now THAT is something you DEFINITELY need to know :) Good lord!

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Is it bleeding? if yes, there'll be info in the infotopic section. Fine flour can help staunch the bleeding: cornflour, arrowroot.

I was told NOT to use cornflour for this - something to do with cornflours reaction to liquid.

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Is it bleeding? if yes, there'll be info in the infotopic section. Fine flour can help staunch the bleeding: cornflour, arrowroot.

I was told NOT to use cornflour for this - something to do with cornflours reaction to liquid.

I wonder if anyone could clarify this?? I keep cornflour in a sealed container for this very purpose :?

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I put flour on his perches and put him in a dish of flour to make sure the bleeding was stopped.

 

Steve is a CAG. I'll get in touch with the vet if anything changes. Ill get the perches clean with the bird disenfectant we got from a pet shop.

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Guest ramagel

I was told NOT to use cornflour for this - something to do with cornflours reaction to liquid.

Hmm ... odd. It's exactly cornflour's reaction to liquid that does the job!

 

Can you remember who told you that or what explanation they gave about the reaction to liquid?

 

Like so many others (and the advice in the sticky, I think) it's the first thing I reach for. I too have it in the drawer with all the other first-aid bits and bobs where I can get at it quickly the minute I notice the bleeding.

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i have it in just in case which was lucky when johnny had his accident! it meant i couldn't make gravy for the sunday roast though cos it took THAT much to actually get it on the wound! ;) hope you get poor steve sorted soon!

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Some thoughts on helping us all cope with parroty emergencies (with links to others like first aid, moving a bird in an emergency, resuscitation and so on) .....

CARING FOR A BIRD DURING AN EMERGENCY/ACCIDENT©:

https://www.parrot-link.co.uk/index.php?topic=18087.0

(from the forum's INFORMATION TOPICS© section .... https://www.parrot-link.co.uk/forum/22-parrot-link-information-topics/

why not have a stroll around to see what interests you?)

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I was told NOT to use cornflour for this - something to do with cornflours reaction to liquid.

Hmm ... odd. It's exactly cornflour's reaction to liquid that does the job!

 

Can you remember who told you that or what explanation they gave about the reaction to liquid?

 

 

Cornflour is negatively thixotropic which means that when it is mixed with a small amount of fluid, it is liquid at rest, but goes solid if you create any turbulence. Try mixing a little water with some and you will see what I mean - you can pour it, but you can also roll it into a ball - as long as you keep it moving, it stays solid. It works with custard powder too.

 

Because of this property, it can seep into open blood vessels (as it is liquid) and enter the bloodstream, where it encounters turbulence (blood flow) and goes solid, forming thrombi (blockages). The blockage sets off the clotting cascade, leading to an even bigger thrombi that can track back along the blocked vessel. Bits can also break off and form thromboemboli elsewhere.

In a torn claw or the like, the blood vessel is an 'end vessel', so the clotting effect of the cornflour is helpful in stopping the bleeding with no further consequences. In skin wounds though, you have broken vessels that are 'going somewhere', if that makes sense, so blocking them prevents bloodflow to wherever they were going. These blockages can be fatal in some vessels.

 

The person who told me is training to be a Vet - good enough for me.

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Thankyou Net, that is what I was going to post earlier on, but I thought that a certain person would shot me down in flames again....

 

I can only echo what has been said, if you are in any doubt please either ring or take your bird to the vet asap... Its easy for someone else to say dont worry, but when its your own bird its not that simple.. I know I have been there....

Hope your baby is feeling better now :)

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Thanks Net - great explanation.

Hope you won't mind that I've added it to the following two Infos? ....

HOW TO DEAL WITH BLEEDING BLOOD FEATHERS©:

https://www.parrot-link.co.uk/index.php?topic=11935.0

and

CARING FOR A BIRD DURING AN EMERGENCY/ACCIDENT©:

https://www.parrot-link.co.uk/index.php?topic=18087.0

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