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nutterly_uts

disabled parrot/ babymilestones (african brown headed chick)

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Hello

A girl at work (i work at a vets) is currently handrearing an african brownheaded parrot baby, guestimated to be about 2.5weeks old. He seems to be really well from the feeding side. He has funny feet - he had a tendon problem, some of his toes point the wrong way and his feet are very odd - the left foot points across to the right from the equivalent of his wrist, and the right foot is almost on the wrong way. He is able to grip with his left foot, and one of his toes on the right foot. He has daily "physio" on the advice of the exotics vet where his feet and toes are gently moved to prevent them from seizing up, and he is gaining movement in his feet.

 

I've been asked to ask you lovely people for a bit of a timeline with baby parrots, especially if anyone has experience of african brownheaded parrots. We're trying to find out what the average age he should do things like standing up, trying to perch etc, so we can assess how this little lad is doing. He is trying to sit up to beg, and managing it with pretty good success but we'd like a comparison so we can see how he's doing, since if he's weeks behind and his foot mobility doesn't get better, we may need to look at the long term plan for him. The girl currently handraising him is keen to give him a go, don't get me wrong, but she wants to be realistic and his quality of life is paramount.

 

Assuming this little lad is going to do fine, what sort of things may we need to consider for a parrot with moderate use of his feet/possible lack of perching ability?

Does anyone have any other suggestions/experience of things we can try/do to help his feet?

 

Thank you,

 

Carla

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I'm sure someone experienced will be along soon - one thing though he needs to be in quite an enclosed pot in the brooder to try and stop him standing up too soon. If you think to the wild the chicks don't have lots of room in the nest.

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Sorry about the poor babys feet.

I can't find the article, but I know Mr Nigel Harcourt-Brown has done study and a paper on problems with babies, and letting them stand too early etc, nestling practices, like Net pointed out.

Get your friends vets to contact him? To give the baby the best chance.

Iknow you live on jersey, but he is only a phone call away.

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One good way to get babies to use their feet is to put a wire mesh grid on the cage floor. Obviously it must not be possible for the foot to get trapped.

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Guest gothbob

on a positive note our GCC fred has got only one working (1 toe missing) foot but he manages to be a regular parrot pretty easily, he will even chase feet.

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First let me say that it is really great that every effort is being made to bring this chick a long. As far as time lines go forget any form of comparison please.

 

I currently have 2 chicks crippled at hatching. Here is the short version( which is still quite long) of how we progressed.

 

1st CAG. Splayed leg from the hip. useless leg and toes which just hung from the knee. Initially I straightened the leg from the hip (3 weeks old) from there I continued to rear with it placed very comfy in a suspended support. Physio daily followed.

by 14 weeks she was fully weaned and able to get around using the good leg although the foot was quite weak and hung on with her beak when not on the floor of the cage. She learnt very quickly how to balance on her tummy.

 

Next step was to set up the cage. I used a dog type cage wide and low. We installed all sizes of perches and found the bigger the better. I then added a series of platforms (rodent type with the tops hollowed out) like ladders up the sides.

 

Within 6 months she was moving all over the cage using her good leg and beak to move and had started to wiggle the useless foot. At about a year old she was perching on the macaw size perches with both feet.

 

Today at 4 years old she gets about everywhere, perches and even hold large chunks of food with the disabled leg.

What she will not do is step up as the grip is weaker than normal.

 

2nd Tiel. I found this little tiel in a nest box at a friend aviary in november along with 2 others who had frozen to death as there was no bedding in the box. Stiff as a board and only 5 days old. Just as I was about to dispose of her i felt a flicker of movement and realised she was still alive. After thawing out and first feed I realised she still had hope.

 

She took 6 months to wean, 4 months to gain any movement in the feet which faced any which way and a full year before she could perch. We followed exactly the same method as the grey and today she is a fully flighted, perching birdie, who is equally as happy as my grey.

The only thing I did different was to place a foot splint on her toes for about 6 weeks when she was tiny to try and get every thing to settle in the right direction.

 

I have the priviledge of spending 6 month working with a top avain in SA and saw him straighten may legs and feet. I know that in doing so bones are often broken, but birds have an amazing ability to repair and adapt given enough time.

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One of my caiques has a deformed foot - Tinker has 3 working toes and one thats twisted the wrong way round. The vet says if this had been strapped in the correct position whilst she was very young it may well have develeoped properly. However this doesn't impede her in any way at all.

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my hoarce has a deformed foot (splayed) and his other leg was broken and he chewed his toes off he now has only 1 toe on this leg which is usless and has no movement .

he manages great climbing and getting about

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