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enigmastaff

adopting a rehome? .........

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Hi all, I am in search of our first African Grey. There are many advertised for sale as young as 16 weeks (yes a rehome!) to a few years old.

My question is, what are the problems you can encounter with rehomes and what age is a good age to get a rehome?

I am wondering if it would be better to get a rehome rather than a new baby, or whether a baby straight from its breeder would be better. The grey we get will be coming into a house with 3 kids ranging from 9-15, me and hubby, 2 dogs and a cockatiel

 

advice more than welcomed!!

 

many thanks

Ems

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Hi Ems,

 

There are many many unwanted birds out there with so much love to give, all of ours have been some form of rescue birds (and there is quite a few lol) and they vary in age from a 12 week old disabled grey threatened with killing if he couldn't be sold for a good amount right to a 20 year old grey whos owners were poory ! Yes you do get some problems and bad habits but with time, love, patience, understanding reasearch and support this can be overcome .

 

All our birds move in to a mad house with 7 kids , me , OH, 3 dogs, 4 rabbits i ginger pig and a good supply of headache tablets

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Hi ems,...

i have most of my birds from re-homes in 1 way or another, i perfur them to buying from breeders, as leigh said with time they settle in yes they can have bad habits but they can make you laugh with the funny things they have picked up from their last owner, i had a cockatiel that i brought of someone who had it in their aviery in the back garden and all it did was a house arlam, my sons pet senagal was a re-home twice befor i got him (the last owner could not get near him so sold him back to to the person who he got it of) he has now been with us 2 yrs, no one can get near him when he's in the cage but when he's out he's fine under his terms, but the noises he comes out with will make you piss yourself with laughter, so re-homes has it's good sides and bad sides it depens on what you want and if you have time and pantince of a saint to get over the bad side of a parrot or any bird that you re-home

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Hiya,

All of my birds were rehomes of a sort, two were sold to pet shops because the owners couldn't handles them, and three others came to me through friends. I now only have three left (the two pet shop ones, and a cockatoo that a friend gave us because she couldn't handle her).

 

In my experience rehomed younger birds can be easier to mould. Older birds are more set in their ways and can be aggressive and scared of things you won't know about until they show you. They may also have a lower health level... you don't know what their diet was like, what their history was etc. However like madanimallover has pointed out, they are often quirky and bring alot of habits and behaviours which are unexpected and thoroughly endearing, and often hilarious. My mum got a hand reared grey from a breeder, she was very loving at first, and still is, although i have found that my rehomed grey is more sure of himself, allowing me to do more things with him than my mums would ever let you do.

 

Both have their merits and their 'faults' although i have found if you win the trust of a rehomed/rescue bird it is far more rewarding and fulfilling, as they've chosen to interact... I had a grey, burt, from the RSPCA, he'd had a hard life and was with me for only a few years before he passed on in December (had no idea how old he was - but he was no spring chicken), he hated pretty much anything, however, with patience i managed to get him to the stage where he could sit on my shoulder whilst i did the washing up. He would chase the GSD/rotti/lab cross dog across the room - very funny. Watching him find his confidence was a joy. Mickey on the other hand, is over 30, and loves my OH and although will take the odd bit of affection from me, if she's feeling hormonal will chase me etc...

 

A 'new' parrot may be easier, but it is no sure thing... parrots are stubborn individuals who will do what they want, usually when they want it, and many people who get a 'new' one, however reared, can be disappointed to find that their new bird gives them the cold shoulder. Although usually they adapt to a new household quite well and can be easier to train.

 

Most parrots, bar those with a nervous disposition, love mayhem and noise, and chasing dogs or feeding them biscuits and seeds etc. And the noises they'll pick up from a busy family can be brilliant - so you'll be in for a treat whichever you choose.

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hi, ive never had a baby parrot from a breeder..

all my 3 have had previous homes..

all well cared for before hand except for charlie who was mutlited when he was clipped...he will never fly bless cant even flap a wing or two...

ive never had any real problems with them,and i get satisfaction from the fact that now lucky me has them forever...

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My grey was HR and 12 weeks when I got her last October. She was (and still is if she's in the mood) very cuddly - and at times its full on love - but only with myself and hubby! She gets full of indignation if I let anyone into the house and glares at them - if they get too close she lunges at them - prepared to bite. Now up until Christmas approx. she loved everyone and happily accepted being fussed over but something seems to have changed that! She is also growing in confidence and experimenting with her beak when thwarted from her chosen activity, but then so would I in her situation ha ha!

 

I can only suppose that the ads are full of greys 6 months to 2 years in particular as 'the nature of the beast' begins to show itself, and many people can't hack it! I have had my moments of thinking 'what have I done' - fleetingly I hasten to add! If I was to get another I would definately contemplate a rehome, to give them a chance. At the end of the day they are such individuals from what I can see so I guess you pays your money and takes your chance.

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A thought or two from my experiences ....

 

whether a baby or an older rescue the key is to start as you mean to go on. Now I don't mean be harsh in any way but this might help explain ...

ADVICE FOR WHEN YOU BRING YOUR FIRST PARROT HOME©:

https://www.parrot-link.co.uk/topic/7493-advice-for-when-you-bring-your-new-parrot-home/

= from the INFORMATION TOPICS© section: https://www.parrot-link.co.uk/forum/22-parrot-link-information-topics/

 

Of course you have to make allowances for a rescue that could have issues but it is a brand new start for both you and the bird. For instance, many pluckers have stopped in a new home as the total change from everything they knew provides a blank slate that the owner can use as a fresh chance to begin anew.

 

As to age .... I took on a bird who was 45+ and had spent all of her previous years in the same home but she adapted beautifully, took it all in her stride and went on to learn new words and behaviours and become thoroughly settled with us.

 

Many of the ads for birds being sold between one and three are from sellers who do not understand that their cuddly baby is growing up into a proper bird, testing boundaries etc. These birds can be a great choice for a buyer as all they need is some firm but gentle guidance to see them through this stroppy toddler phase into a happy adulthood beyond.

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My very first bird (Jabber an Orange Winged Amazon) I took on in November 06 is a rehome case and I wouldn't ever discourage people from doing the same as theese birds are the ones that are more deserving of a happier life imo, they're the unlucky ones and I don't regret taking him on for a second, but...

 

It's not a decision to be taken lightly and owners should have no expectations of the bird, but be able to and be honest with thereselves that they can accept and love the bird for what it is and anything achieved after that point is a bonus. As I said I've had Jabber since Nov 06 and I'm still working with him, tryin new things, ideas I come accross to help him socially with people even now. The bird you take on may fall in love with you within weeks and be the perfect companion, but you must be ready to accept any eventuality.

 

Best of luck!

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All the birds here are rehomes. They came in for various reasons not enough time to just not wanted anymore. One is a plucker and a real little devil (that is just her personality though). One isnt anywhere near the point of being handled yet, and the other two are sweethearts. I tend to think older birds are better because they have been through their "teen" years. Yes you still have hormones, but you will get these with any bird. I have met countless rehomed birds that have fantastic personalities, and knowing how many needing to be rehomed are out there, Id be reluctant to say the least about buying a baby and contributing to this. I know a lot (not you guys) of people think that a bird being rehomed must have real issues but this is not always the case.

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Guest Gwydhyel

All of my birds have been second-hand parrots, and I would highly recommend them. Of course some will have problems, but a huge number of those available are simply pets that have outgrown their appeal and usefulness as they grew into adult birds.

 

Much like lots of other baby animals really.

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