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debrambell

How Come (roost different amounts of time in summer/winter)

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it seems so strange to me. probably not for some but why do parrots or any of our feathered friends it is OK to put them to roost in winter for 12 hours + and that is OK with them but then in the summer months maybe 8 hours?

I know about the daylight - duh- .

this sounds like a really stupid question but if they have 12 hours sleep in fall why do they not need that in summer? or visa versa?

gosh I have made no sense ----I think :oops: :oops:

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I think their body-clocks respond to light and dark (dawn and dusk) rather than the hours we use to measure time passing?

 

I always advise anyone whose parrot has become grumpy or stroppy to ensure that the bird is getting enough quality sleep.

 

I don't have the seasonal variation as my birds maintain a twelve hour day .... I have both blackout blinds to shut out early summer light and a day-light lamp on a timer to extend their winter evenings.

 

I don't think it is absolutely necessary to have the above unless there is a problem and doesn't help aviary birds as they are closer to the outside and so more in direct contact with nature's days/night times as the seasons change

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I have the same set up as MMM. It was only properly set up for 60%, 3 years ago and the balance in the last year.

 

I have seen a great improvement of both feather/health and overall temper since using lights and blackout.

 

We domesticate our feather friends and take away a big chunk of choices from their lives. As such we need to be responsible for providing as much from nature as we can.

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Birds dont need twelve hours or in the winter even sixteen hours sleep. In the wild they dont have a choice at that time of the year. It gets dark and they have to roost until it gets light. They cannot flick on a lightswitch like we do indoors.

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I think this is in relationship to my original post. it is now dusk here in Ohio approx. 4:30PM. Sonny and Cher perch on outside of cage napping. it is not dark (night) out side but know they are sleeping.... one foot tucked up head buried in wing.

how come at this time if I move them into their cage and cover for night they "Become Alive" squawking and really trying to give me what for until I let them back out.

if I wait for them to start their ear piercing extravaganza "time to go to bed", which is approx.5:30 PM. they are reluctant and a battle to go in cage but they do then eventually call it a night quietly? :oops:

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Yet again - just like toddlers - will fight bedtime only to fall asleep instantly once you get them there (hopefully!)

 

Also, parrots generally live naturally nearer the equator, which does not have such a drastic change in number of daylight hours - at least I think that's right!

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Yes, that's right. Around 12 hours light, 12 hours dark.

In my opinion it can only benefit our parrots if we do as much as we can to replicate the life lived in the wild.

Giving them total quiet while they're in the dark is good for them too. They're 'programmed' to be alert for predators, so won't sleep well if they hear sounds.

 

If we know what to aim for we can try and do the best we can, given our home circumstances. :D

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