Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
oggie1

A Wild Grey... (living free - to catch or not?)

Recommended Posts

Just some thoughts folks.

 

I've recentley heard about a CAG living amongst a flock of pigeons near here.

I've been told it's been there for the last 2 1/2 years,He/she appears in good condition(one old man in particular makes the journey everyday to make sure they have food).I've been told this bird will defend itself if somebody tries to reach it or grab for him.

Now my problem is do I leave this bird in the seemingly happy life it has become accustomed to,or do I try to rescue him/her.

My gut instinct is to leave him where he is and make sure there is plenty of food.

I'm also torn the other way after reading many of the lost posts,especially Potty's Mum (Our dear Debs :wink: ).

 

Chris :wink:

 

BTW I've never seen this bird,although I've heard him I could not make out where he was.A mate of mine says his partner has a photo of the bird and when she gets the film developed he'll bring it and show me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is a hard one but my opinion would be to try and catch it, not for any other reason than if some unscrupulous person hears about this and thinks they could make a quick pound or two then they will try and catch it. The bird may be injured during this or even driven off from its 'flock'.

It seems a shame if it has found a way to survive but we also know how easily these creatures tall prey to illness.

I dont really know, the more i think of it the harder the decision becomes.......

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sue the thought of a greedy catching him fills me with rage,and yes for that reason I would go and catch him.He is back with nature now though and whatever mother nature throws at him is as it should be I feel.

 

Chris :wink:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My initial gut reaction would be to want to catch it to see if there's a ring, scan and see if there's a microchip and generally examine the bird for good health.

If it behaved truly wildly and had no identification, no reported losses in that area and was not thin etc ..... think I'd opt for releasing it again.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I get the feeling(don't know why)he has been a wild caught and escaped from an aviary,so to allow him his freedom is to me at least justice.I I see or find that he has a ring(closed)Then I would be more inclined to catch,vet check and release again.

 

Chris :wink:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I get the feeling(don't know why)he has been a wild caught and escaped from an aviary,so to allow him his freedom is to me at least justice.I I see or find that he has a ring(closed)Then I would be more inclined to catch,vet check and release again.

 

Chris :wink:

Posted Image

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Can I play devil's advocate here?

 

There is no way to humanely catch a wild bird. Obviously a parrot lover would go about it in a very careful way, but the result would be the same - one really terrified bird.

 

The owner may have unsuccessfully attempted to catch this bird when it first escaped, so already knows that their bird is still out there - and be content that it has not only survived, but found a life for itself.

Quite a good life I'd say - freedom, food and a flock.

 

Any attempt to catch it could result in it being driven away from its food and its flock.

Also, the attempt could have bad repercussions on the flock of pigeons it lives with.

 

What if it was caught and the owner was found?

Would it then be condemned to the miserable life of a wild-caught?

With weeks of re-training ahead of it - until it came to accept its confined life?

 

Don't get me wrong here. I am 110% behind catching newly escaped parrots. They don't belong in the wild, and it's very hard for them out there.

However, this bird has made a life for itself out there. 2 1/2 years is a very long time.

 

Just my gut feelings to add to the debate. :wink:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Gwydhyel

I agree that if it has made a life for itself in the wild, maybe it's best to leave well alone. If it had wanted to seek out human company then it could have done so during such a long period of time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with cgm here too.

The bird has been living wild for over 2 years now and seems to be fit, healthy and happy with his/her flock. Why take that away from it?

We all go on about how bad we feel about taking the birds from the wild (Ok I know this isnt the best enviroment for the bird but, its still wild), this one has made a home for itself and is happy..

Did you say there was a gentleman who was going daily to feed this bird? If so he will soon see if there is any problem with the bird, then maybe thinking about catching him/her should go ahead. Also could it be that the gentleman in question IS the birds original owner?? Just a thought..

 

Good luck though in whatever you decide to do :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For me there is only one answer. Let it be.

 

If this bird has intergrated into a flock of pigeons and has survived two and half years and appears in good health then it has earned the right to fly free and live the life of a natural bird.

 

I have lost a couple of birds from my aviary and so can easlily identify with the heartache that brings, of never knowing if they made it or not.

 

We are all bird lover here and as such will move heaven and earth if we can to care for our own and any bird we come into contact with.

 

To capture this particular CAG would be abject cruelty. What ever we can offer is only a token of what it deserves.

 

In a perfect world no bird would ever have the constraints of a cage, an avairy, brick walls or human interferance of any kind. We all pray that when we lose a bird it will fly over rainbow bridge and be free and whole, never to be caged again.

 

This CAG has it's own Rainbow Bridge here where we can see. At best a little extra food should be the total extent of any interferance. I do mean a little, as should it become dependent on human intervention it may lose the fear of man and the instinct to survive. That in it's self would be another form of injustice.

 

Just my thought's of which I do not expect all tyo agree.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For me there is only one answer. Let it be.

 

If this bird has intergrated into a flock of pigeons and has survived two and half years and appears in good health then it has earned the right to fly free and live the life of a natural bird.

 

I have lost a couple of birds from my aviary and so can easlily identify with the heartache that brings, of never knowing if they made it or not.

 

We are all bird lover here and as such will move heaven and earth if we can to care for our own and any bird we come into contact with.

 

To capture this particular CAG would be abject cruelty. What ever we can offer is only a token of what it deserves.

 

In a perfect world no bird would ever have the constraints of a cage, an avairy, brick walls or human interferance of any kind. We all pray that when we lose a bird it will fly over rainbow bridge and be free and whole, never to be caged again.

 

This CAG has it's own Rainbow Bridge here where we can see. At best a little extra food should be the total extent of any interferance. I do mean a little, as should it become dependent on human intervention it may lose the fear of man and the instinct to survive. That in it's self would be another form of injustice.

 

Just my thought's of which I do not expect all tyo agree.

i whole heartedly agree with that,we dont even know at what age it escaped?it may have lived longer in the wild than it has in captivity,to take that away now would be cruel,no different than taking it from the wild in its origional homeland,it must have been a great struggle for it to have survied so long,it has now mastered the art of survival,to take that away now would mean all that struggling would be invane,

if that was my bird,i would be heartbroken,but there would still be a little part of me somwhere that would have to grin to myself that this little bird won, let him be,im sure hes much happier now he has his freedom,the right he was born with

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am of the opinion that the bird should be left alone, to do otherwise would be cruel, if the bird has survived 2.5 years why spoil something which is obviously doing the bird the world of good.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is no way to humanely catch a wild bird. Obviously a parrot lover would go about it in a very careful way, but the result would be the same - one really terrified bird.

 

Contrary to the impression given by the ANTI`s about the inhumane methods used by the trappers catching birds for the pet trade and the pot . There are safe and very effective methods for catching wild birds with minimal stress to the birds which are used by members of the British Trust for Ornithology and others catching birds for study & release after ringing them . And in areas where Conservationists have been working alongside of trappers some of these techniques are now used instead of the barbaric methods used in the past .

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Perhaps one of these conservationally minded, caring trappers could humanely help to remove this one from the wild. I am sure they would do it, if there's a chance of making a few quid :lol:

 

Then it's sold onto the white van man, so he can make a few more pounds, selling it as a English breed tame and talking Grey with cage for a mere £250 :roll:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Gosh! Quite a dilemma - and lots of good arguments both for and against. Its hard to believe it has survived our weather apart from anything else, and presuming that greys knock spots off pigeons in the intelligence stakes, it must be 'top of the flock'!

 

Think I would definately like to see it for myself to get a general picture of how well it was doing before reaching a final conclusion, but if it has survived for over 2 years............? (Having fantasies of flocks of wild greys flying into the garden).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

personally i would say try and catch it and give it to a zoo or parrot sanctuary where there is others of its kind preferably in a big outdoor aviary. like has been said what if white van man catches it and sells it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My personal opinion is to leave it. If it's been the wild now for this long, then it has obviously adapted to life in the wild. To remove it would be cruel at this stage. Just my opinion, and I know it's a difficult one.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Perhaps one of these conservationally minded, caring trappers could humanely help to remove this one from the wild. I am sure they would do it, if there's a chance of making a few quid :lol:

 

Then it's sold onto the white van man, so he can make a few more pounds, selling it as a English breed tame and talking Grey with cage for a mere £250 :roll:

NOT ALL PEOPLE ARE TOTALLY MONEY ORIENTATED & with the exception of the paid staff BTO ringers do not work for money and provide their own equipment and rings out of their own money or out of funds raised solely for that purpose .

As for getting a BTO ringer to help if you could find one with suitable equipment I`me sure they would help but the majority will not have gear strongenough to safely capture a grey !

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I swing back and for on this ..... I totally agree that if the bird is doing fine it should be left to live the life it has chosen so well.

Yet the 'responsible' side of me says ..... what if this were a much grieved bird like Pottys Mum's?

 

Is there perhaps a way anyone with a telescope or really powerful binoculars could get a close enough look to see if there is a ring?

If there were no ring that would be enough for me to leave my responsible side alone and say ..... let the bird stay free.

If there was a ring and a safe way of capture, my conscience would mean I'd have to opt for trying to read that number, scan for a microchip, evaluate health, give a dose of wormer .... and then let the bird go immediately if no details match any lost in that area.

 

Two and a half years is as much as many Greys in the wild in their natural surroundings would live so this bird is doing very well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

given the size of the lettering on the rings it is impossible to read that even with a telescope which is why when research on large birds such as wildfowl is done they are fitted with numbered coloured wing tags with large figures on them !

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

2.5 years, and still there? With a street value of at least a couple of hundred squid I would have thought that every man and his dog would be setting up larson traps to make a quick few quid.

 

My action, if I was in the same situation, would be to leave the bird be.

Reasons?

1. Living with pigeons for 2.5 years means that the parrtot must be as tough as old boots, bearing in mind that this means two winters and 2.5 years of close contact with birds that are probably every other birds worst enemy. Feral pigeons are notorios for the copious amount of birdy pathogens they freely scatter about.

2. I wouldn't have the time, or inclination to take on the responsibilty of catching an escapee and all the extra work involved if the catching was succesful.

3. ref: reason 1. I would not put my own birds at risk by even the slightest chance of them coming into contact with all the nasties that a long term feral bird may host.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...