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gary

Care sheet (s)

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Ok were into our breeding season again  with our Conures & Senegal's & are updating our care package we give to new owners.

 

Can any one suggest anything that we've missed off or shouldnt be there....I wont be offended at all by any suggestions or comments ....were just trying to give as much helpful info as possible....without telling buyers to get this or that book :wink:

Thanks for your time & input.

 

 

Care Sheet

https://www.parrot-link.co.uk  to get loads of friendly advice from parroty people.

 

Its important if your introducing your baby to an existing bird in your home to do it very slowly. A separate cage must be used to keep the new baby in for at least 1 week before you allow them together. Put the cages side by side but not touching…contact me for further advice!

 

With the very high cost involved in visiting the vets these days you may like to consider insuring your bird (s).

 

Please close windows, curtains & blinds when you let your baby out of its cage.

 

Cages: I believe the general consensus regarding cages is "the larger the better". One word of caution however, the bars must be close enough together so that there is no possibility of the bird getting his head caught between the bars. Recommended minimum measurements for the smaller birds are 24 inches long, 16 inches wide and 20 inches high. Larger species should have a cage at least 44 x 26 x 40.The cage should be square or rectangular with horizontal bars, so the birds can climb.

 

Perches: In addition, perches supplied with cages are often too thin or too thick. Make sure the perch is about 3/4 to 1 inch in diameter so that the bird's claws cannot quite reach around them. The bird will then have a better grip and their toenails are less likely to become overgrown. Concrete perches are recommended these are very helpful to the bird's feet agile & nails filed down which you can imagine could be a problem. However one small concrete perch is enough in a single cage,

Natural perches are extremely useful. A least one perch should be placed high in the cage since Conures/Senegals love roosting as high as possible. Be careful not to fill the cage with too many perches however. There should be plenty of space for them to move about. If using natural branches, be sure they have not been sprayed with insecticides. Elder, willow, eucalyptus, and small fruit tree branches have been recommended.

While on the subject of plants, please make note of the various plants you have in the surrounding area. Birds LOVE plants, and many plants are poisonous.

 

Lighting / Temperature: It is very important not place your bird's cage where there are drafts. They too, can catch colds if they get chilled. Generally, whatever temperature is comfortable for you will be fine for your bird.

Lighting is also important. The experts recommend that birds receive some indirect sunlight. Just like humans, they too need sunshine to stay healthy. Some owners place full-spectrum lighting near their bird’s cages. If you do choose to use this type of lighting be sure to only use only those which are made especially for birds.

 

Household Dangers: There are several common household items, which are potentially harmful and possibly fatal to your bird. Please make a note of them and do further research if any of these issues affect you.

Birds have a very sensitive respiratory systems and these items are toxic to them.

Teflon - This product has been the killer of countless household birds. It is found not only in cooking utensils but also in many other common household appliances, including hairdryers and portable heaters.

Air Fresheners & Scented Candles - Do not use these items around birds. The fumes are toxic.

Carbon Monoxide - This could be an issue if you use natural gas heaters. Please have your boilers checked regularly. Carbon Monoxide detectors are so cheap there’s no excuse from not having one to protect you and your loved ones.

Other Pets - While some owners report that their birds and other animals get along fantastically, it should be noted that it only takes one bite or scratch from a cat or dog to kill your bird. The germs they carry in their saliva and on their claws are deadly to birds.

Cleaning Products - Almost all cleaning products are toxic.

Fly sprays are dangerous and should be avoided near birds.

Perfume / Hairspray - Birds have very sensitive respiratory systems and these items are toxic to them.

 

Odd Behaviour

Head Bobbing: I've read that this is mostly a baby gesture. They do this to tell show their parents that they are hungry. Apparently, they continue to do it in adulthood as an "attention getter."

Backing Up: When your bird backs up to your hand or whatever and rubs her behind on you, basically... hmmm...well.... she's in love Its a female sexual manoeuvre and you should feel flattered - she "wants" you

Pecking: I have no idea what this means, but apparently it is a normal behaviour for birds. Parrots do it when they are really concentrating on something, like tearing up a paper towel.

Beak Grinding: Basically this means "I'm a happy camper." Parrots grind their beak mostly at night when they are relaxed and content. But sometimes they will do it during the day after play time or after eating a particularly pleasing meal.

UBEs: UBE stands for "Unidentified Bird Emergency" - Every now and then, birds will become startled "out of the blue" and will go into a panic. This usually consists of flying frantically or flapping their wings and screeching at the top of their lungs. There doesn't have to be a reason, they just do it. It doesn't seem to happen very often and there is usually NOTHING going on... I mean total silence. The "episode" only lasts a few seconds and then they act as if nothing ever happened who knows?

Wing Flapping: When your bird gently flaps his wings close to his body, he wants to come to you. Usually this happens when you walk near or stand close to your birdies cage. French Kissing: For some reason, Conures/Senegals will sometimes try to 'slip you the tongue' when you kiss them. Beware though, the experts warn against letting them do it. Apparently, we humans have bacteria in our mouths for which birds do not have an immunity. So "safe" kissing only .

 

Toys: Toys:Toys - Gotta Have 'Em! Conures/Senegals are very playful birds and can become bored quickly if they don't have anything to amuse themselves. There are countless types of toys on the market and most are very inexpensive. Parrots seems to prefer the hanging types with large wooden beads and ropes at the bottom. Of course, within a few days, the wood beads are only a memory.Try to get the correct size toys for you bird...too big or too large could be a waste of money.

Zinc Be careful where you buy your toys from only use reputable sellers .....some metal parts could contain zinc which can be fatal to birds if unsure dont buy. If you use

Rope swings or perches please be aware if they fray.....they can then get caught up in the birds nails, toes, feet & legs and has been known to cause death!

 

Bath Time

Conures/Senegals love to take baths, as do most birds. Most pet shops sell small bathing tubs made especially for birds. However, I find a glass pie plate works quite well. I only put a little over a quarter of an inch of lukewarm water in it and it seems to work perfectly. Besides they have more room to splash and he can REALLY spread his wings.

 

Bed Time

Parrots, according to the experts, need 12 hours of uninterrupted sleep each night.

 

Training

One of the first things a new owner should do is to train their bird the "Up" command. This command will be very helpful to you in the future.

The "Up" Command: Basically, the idea is to teach the bird to "step up" onto your finger or hand held perch upon your command. I have taught babies to do this in just a few short sessions over a period of a couple of days. The method I used was to put my finger against his body just above his feet and said "Step Up". When he did step on my finger I praised him. We did this over and over again until he "got it". They are very eager to please their owners and if they can figure out what you want, they will generally do it for you.

 

Overwhelming Screeching: There are several reasons why a bird may have screeching problems, namely being spoiled, lonely or stressed. If the screeching relates to being spoiled... (wants to be with you every waking moment of the day or else!), then I would suggest possibly covering his cage for a few moments when he starts to scream. After he becomes quiet, then remove the cover. You must be consistent with this method for it to work. These little guys are very smart and will quickly learn that if they scream they will get covered. This particular method worked for us with a screecher very quickly.

If that doesn't do the trick, you may have to resort to moving him to a quieter part of the house. Sometimes a new bird will become stressed easily if there is a lot of activity going on around him all the time.

As for loneliness, the best cure of course, is more time from his humans. If that is impossible, perhaps you can relieve it by giving him new toys, treats or possibly even leave the radio or tv on for him. Of cause you can always get him/her a friend.

 

Skittishness: Sometimes a newly acquired bird may exhibit a lack of trust and be skittish. This behaviour is normal. It is quite traumatic for a bird to be moved to a new home. Birds that have had previous owners are especially affected, particularly if the bird was mistreated or neglected. The only advice I can give is to be patient, talk softly and often to the bird and offer him treats from your hand. Eventually, he will hopefully come to see you as a friend.

 

Training No No's: Never, ever, ever punish your bird by hitting him, spraying him with water or by screaming at him. These guys have very sensitive personalities, and you can warp him for life. They will not forgive and forget! It takes years sometimes, if ever, for abused birds to become trusting again.

 

Lifespan

According to a recent article the lifespan of Conures was shown to be a maximum of 25 years and the average lifespan was quoted as being 15 years. I have even heard of Conures living as long as 35 years & Senegals 45 years. It is not uncommon for exotic bird owners to include a clause in their wills providing for the care of their birds in the event the birds outlive the owners.

 

Thanks again Gary & Sandra

 

 

edited to add Jo's helpful tips

further edited to add Cgm's helpful tips

further edited to add Net's helpful tip

Further edited to add Stormbird's  concerns re Fly Spray(best to be safe)

Thanks guys

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looks pretty good to me, wish I'd been given something like that with my first bird!

 

Maybe extend the toy section a bit to mention safety - ie zinc coated parts, getting the right size toy for the birds, watch for frayed rope etc. ?

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looks pretty good to me, wish I'd been given something like that with my first bird!

 

Maybe extend the toy section a bit to mention safety - ie zinc coated parts, getting the right size toy for the birds, watch for frayed rope etc. ?

Thats a great point Jo thanks :wink: will add that :D

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Huge great big thanks to Gary for allowing us to link to this in ...

ADVICE FOR WHEN YOU BRING YOUR FIRST PARROT HOME©:

https://www.parrot-link.co.uk/topic/7493-advice-for-when-you-bring-your-new-parrot-home/

= from the INFORMATION TOPICS© section: https://www.parrot-link.co.uk/forum/22-parrot-link-information-topics/

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Is Ardap safe :?: the answer to that is some what questionable When it 1st became available I did wonder about how good/safe it was to use especially as I keep fish & Amphibians as well as my birds and decided against using it after discussing this with Quiko .

seeing this again I ran a web search and came up with this data sheet

 

http://www.labtecltd.com/downloads/7422.pdf

 

is is an effective product that does need handling with some caution :shock: Whilest it is ??? not toxic to birds it is best used away from them !

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Excellent post Gary, hope more breeders follow your good breeding practice :)

 

Just need to say Ive met Gary's breeding birds, and wow what beauties.

I can definatly see why with all the care and devotion that goes into them. Well done Gary. :D

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Guest ytagguk

i have to agree with stormbird, ardap is not safe, no matter what it says on the can, i have a can of this with me at the minute, i rescue ducks, and when a duck leaves, for a new home, or to return to the pond, i clean out the duck house with virkon, and then i use ardap.

i use ardap because it is STRONG, and EFFECTIVE!! i would never use it if a duck was living in the house, or even if it was going to be in the area the next day, this stuff stinks, it has loads of warnings on the tin, and IT IS extremely dangerous to fish.

there is no such thing as a safe fly spray if you have birds in the house.

Yvonne

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the only fly stuff we use is fly paper

 

 

Me too :wink:

 

Care sheet edited again to include concerns Stormbird & ytagguk have re Fly Sprays.....always best to err on the side of caution :D

 

Thanks for the input guys :wink:....... Any others :?:

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Guest ytagguk

great news, i did look into this further, and it is very toxic as i thought, and one of the chemicals in the tin, is extremely toxic to cat's,

i would never use this near any animal at all.

Yvonne

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I enjoyed Point 12! Friendly: usually (unless you ring on Saturdays, my brain-dead day, or before 9.30 am) Quick: most times.

Seriously though a very good care sheet and I wish ALL breeders gave similar advice.

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I enjoyed Point 12! Friendly: usually (unless you ring on Saturdays, my brain-dead day, or before 9.30 am) Quick: most times.

Seriously though a very good care sheet and I wish ALL breeders gave similar advice.

It was Saturday when you rang me #-o

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