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vikky

Cuban amazon

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Very interested in this bird atm........not as an owner btw just curious about them......anyone have any info about this bird or perhaps even hands on experience?

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Guest choccyb

No info on them sorry, just wanted to say that I have met one (whilst in Cuba) and they are now extremely rare over there. This poor little chap was in a cage full of little birds (no other parrots) all alone slumped on a perch and was either tame (I decided to be a smart arse.... i know about parrots blah blah blah.....) and put my hand in and tickled him and he didnt flinch, or he was so fed up that he couldnt care less what went on around him. Have to say they not great with animals over there, he had a runny nose and his eyes were not that bright poor thing. I just wanted to rescue him but of course I couldnt.

 

They are fairly small in size compared to other amazons.

 

Stacey xxx

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I have a friend in Cuba who has one of these.

 

They are gorgeous birds. He lives in the back garden which is open and he doesnt ever fly away. The only person that can make a fuss of it is the mother as its her bird.

 

Cant really give any info on it but heres a link from the parrot society website

http://www.theparrotsocietyuk.org/genarticle12.shtml

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I forgot to add that he talks aswell, but i couldnt understand a word of it cos it was in Spanish.................its so funny to hear a bird talk in another language :lol::lol:

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they are getting more popular as aviary birds in this country but are not what you call common but there are a few people breeding them, from what ive been told about them the males can be very aggresive toward the hens at breeding time and may kill them if conditions are not right, but they are very very good looking birds

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They are now relatively common in the UK. I can remember when they were about £4,000 a pair but now I doubt if you would have to pay more than £900. The originals were notoriously aggressive, esp the males, but as with many of the smaller Amazons, a few generations of captive-breeding has removed this characteristic. A worthwhile aviary bird if you want to help promote the species rather than produce HR "pets".

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Cubans are Cites 1 birds,and so need paperwork.David is correct that aggression is bred out over 3-4 generations and so now it is usually easy to pair young birds (and this is the same for the Yellow Faced and Hispaniolan).Young pairs £900 adults £1200 -£1500 pr with hens fetching much more than males.

They are not difficult to find,hence many of the breeders have moved onto the harder to breed birds.

They are not as noisy as some Amazons,but even though they are small they require a good sized aviary or will become fat and lethargic unless the diet is controlled.

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I saw an article by Rosemary Low the other day (can't remember which website) and she said she'd known a quite a few that were pluckers. That's quite unusual in Amazons isn't it ?. Presume they can be quite easily stressed ?. Very beautiful little birds though, wish I had the space for them.

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Thanks everyone for your replies.....i will continue researching these great birds until im numb,i have read a few case studies where males have had to be seperated via an inner section in the flight when babies are being parent reared full term as the males tend to get narked once the babies fledge and join the adults in the flight?

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The reason males at times have to be separated from young is because the aviary is tiny,and perhaps they are fed incorrectly during the breeding process. These birds and indeed all Amazons /Greys etc need at least a 16 foot long flight to at least be safe and have room to move around.I am just as guilty as others at the moment on keeping some birds in smaller flights but i have sound systems to allert me to problems and a manager and myself working all daylight hours so we can resolve any problems.I have only bred from 5 pairs of Cubans(i only keep 5 pairs of most due to space and time)and have never had a problem with plucking,and have never seen a plucked Cuban in any collection i have seen,except for i with a health problem.

My old breeding block for the main collection with over 100 aviaries of 16 foot did not produce any of the problems you mention,indeed i would go as far as to suggest that all,if not most problems are created by the keeper not the birds.

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Mike you say 16ft long but how wide.... and if you haven't got the length :oops: could you make it up on the width :shock: :lol:

like 12x8ft

 

only asking as will be building the new birdroom and aviaries after xmas

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Mike K,

Sorry if the mention of plucking caused any offence. I read about it in an article on Cuban Amazons by R. Low on the Parrot Society's website.

 

I don't know anything about Cubans & have never bred any sort of parrot; so it's useful to hear from somebody who has actual experience.

There is so much information out there, for a complete newcomer like me it's a bit of a nightmare sorting fact from fiction.

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No offence taken.

Much that is written is way out of date now,and as mentioned the 3rd plus generation of captive birds are in general far easier to work with than the wild caught,also it seems that many writers have little on zero experience of the species they write about!I do have a book that states clearly that male Eclectus are red!

The best book i have is Genus Amazona by the late John Stoodley,he was a man who wrote about birds he bred and i was fortunate enough to know him.

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To back up MikeK I have a friend who regularly breeds parent-reared Amazons, including Cubans. His birds have large outside flights and are fed well (not by me) and are generally given privacy to get on with it.

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Know how you feel. I love these amazons too. They are among my top five with the red spectacled, hispanolean,yellow naped and vinaceous. Do they need any special diet such as higher percentage of fruits or a higher percantage of veg, protein levels etc

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I suspect that Mike might agree that, within reason, an "expensive" Amazon will be no more difficult to feed than a "common" Amazon. To extend the argument: a Hyacinthine Macaw is still a Macaw as is a Greenwing or any other large Ara. The only way to get experience is to work with a collection of similar birds, ie Poicephalus, rather than do what most of us do which is pick and mix!

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