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princetaz

Biting Rabbit

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I rehomed a cute bunny 2 weeks ago she is 9 months old, pepper lives outside with my other 4 rabbits (in seperate hutches) for the first week I had no problem but for the last few days when I go to feed her she attacks everytime I put my hand in her hutch I now have to feed her wearing thick gloves after a nasty bite on Friday, I am begining to wonder now if she was mistreated anybody had this sort of problem or any ideas other than wearing a suit of armour

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I had one like this once and not only did it bite, it lunge and growled............that was also a rehome and it was basically where the previous owners just never handled the poor thing and it was frightened, it did become very tame in the end, after a lot of hard work and nattering to him.

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i had some baby rabbits earlier in the year and they were handled daily and one of my neighbours had 2 of them and they are still handled daily and one has a tendancy to bite (hard) i think it may just be how they are

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She might be nesting - does will do this even if they've not been mated. The newness of her surroundings have obviously worn off! She will be scared of you and see you as a threat to her so she bites you to make you go away! I did see a programme where they tamed a bunny like this down, they used a brush tied on a stick and gradually started brushing the bunny with said brush. Even if she bites it you don't get hurt, bunny was distracted to another part of the hutch for cleaning. I think the bunny calmed down over a matter of weeks.

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Harry's mummy that is exactly what she does lunges, I have kept rabbits for years and have never seen one do it before well guess I'll just have to keep wearing the gloves lol and confine her whilst cleaning, must admit she scared me cause it b****y hurt but I wont give up that easy

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it could just be her personality. i've kept quite a few rabbits, mostly rescues but the one i have now is definaetly the most feisty. she's a french lop & i've had her from a baby but by god she can have a temper. the previous rabbit (my phoebe who did a couple of months ago) was a mini lop & she was the most gentle cuddliest rabbit you could meet.

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i've had about 25 rabbits in the last 10 years and learned alot. As said before i agree this rabbit has not had much interaction and not alot of trust to who you got it from. It is probably frightened and protecting itself. Rabbits have barked like a dog and honked like a geese! You need to tame rabbits as they are all wild at first and like other pets, you need to handle them securely and kindly to build up trust and a relationship. With the other rabbits, if you let them out together they usually have a pecking order and some times will bully a new rabbit until every bun knows who is top rabbit!

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None of my rabbits have been neutered so they are not let out together the last thing I want is baby rabbits, when I picked pepper up the lady was cuddling her and put her in the carrier, when I got her home I picked her up and cuddled her before putting her in the hutch and she seemed really tame and cuddly but all that has completely changed will just have to keep working with her in the hope she will learn to trust me

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Rabbits can be very territorial. The first step to helping this rabbit is to give her more space in her cage; she needs a place to call her own.

 

Open the door and let her come and go on her own time. Wait until he's out of her cage to clean it, change her water, or do other housekeeping chores.

 

After a few weeks, you can begin to try to touch her in her cage, but don't grab him or mess with her stuff.

 

Wear gloves so you don't jerk your hand around, which may provoke her. Keep your hand above her head and then calmly and quickly bring it down to the top of her head. If she lets you touch her head, very softly stroke it. Tell him what a great big, brave, beautiful rabbit she is.

 

Then let her alone until the next day, when you try the exercise again. Eventually she should associate your hand in the cage with a nice nose rub, not being grabbed.

 

Hope this helps.........it did with my rescue even though I did call him 'Gollum' :wink:

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Hi, You can get bunnies neutered, personally I think this is kinder, as then you take away the hormonally inflenced behaviour, and being as bunnies are "highly sexed" most of the naughty behaviour is hormone related!! :roll:

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I've bred and shown rabbits for years and this does sound like typical female behaviour. Females get sexually mature around this age - and mother nature makes them defend their territory and this unfortunately means you.

 

When you take her out of the cage is she a bit more friendlier? Alot do tend to be that way just in the cage.

 

Some females can be more grumpy than others - also if you have males nearby then the scent of them may make her more in touch with her hormones (not sure if you do - just a thought).

 

She may improve in a few weeks time. :)

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Oh dear - I have always found girl bunnies to be a bit unpleasant like this compared to the bucks we have had.

 

There has been some wonderful advice given, so have a read and see what you think might work best. I had a bunny who thought she was pregnant and became VERY nasty during that time - and made lots of nests. Perhaps having her "done" might help? It will balance her out and hopefully make her easier to handle.

 

Best of luck!

 

xxx

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