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Angel44

Cockatiel Chick Siblings

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I have a lovely lady seriously interested in having both my handreared cockatiels. Her only concern is that if they turn out to be male and female, would they try to breed and how much of a problem is this going to be (they are siblings)? They know about replacing any eggs with fake eggs, so would this be an option?

 

She really sounds like she is going to be the perfect mommy to one/possibly both of my babies and has done all the research before actually getting a bird. Lots of time will be spent with said bird/s.

 

Is this a good idea to let them stay together??? (I hope you say yes as she sounds so lovely I would be delighted if she had them both :wink: ) Any advice welcome please :D

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The chances are that they will attempt to breed when old enough....Cockatiels will even nest on the floor or in seed pots...so I would not say its a good idea for this lady to take both..... 1 baby looks a safer bet....good luck.

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Guest Jane Doe

I would say let her have them both, I'd hate siblings to be seperated. they would proabably call for eachother :( not all cockie pairs breed, I have two brother and sister pairs that occasionally mate but don't lay eggs. If it comes to it, replace eggs with fake eggs. It's only our human taboo of interbreeding that makes us turn our noses up Even if they were allowed to have chicks chances are the babies would be normal. Look at flock birds in the wild, cockatiels, budgies, starlings even they must interbreed. I don't like cockatiels being kept as single birds, they are very sociable birds and love company of their own kind as well as human if tame. I'v been keeping Cocktiels for 11 years, still have my two oldest ones, have kept the babies that have come along because I couldn't part with them. If you have to part with them and she's a good bet go for it, even single birds can lay eggs, it's one of those things with cockatiels.

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Guest Jane Doe

One of my oldest hens is in a pair and laid umpteen eggs over the years, (I have some dummy eggs otherwise I'd be overrun)The other has never laid one also she's has the occasional mating! I give mine calcivet two or 3 times a week multivitamin the same, a good quality seed, hagen tropimix or premium and cockatiel prestiege premium, a bit of fruit and veg and a bit of egg food when needed, cuttle fish, millet spray and a mineral block.

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I have two brother and sister pairs that occasionally mate but don't lay eggs.

good job they don`t !

As for human taboos that`s rubbish it`s nothing to do with taboo it`s because there`s a high probability of genetic malformation in the young , which is why the closest combination that is used even when "line breeding " is mother to son & father to daughter or what I have used is half brother to half sister !

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Still not 100% sure of what to do.... :? I suppose we could always get the dna sexed, as they could very well be the same sex anyway :lol: so all my worrying is over nothing :lol::lol: I am leaning more towards letting them go together, as this lady has done lots of reading, research and preparation so would know how to use the dummy eggs etc. They will have a fantastic home with lots of attention, and we have already agreed that the bird/s will come back to me if circumstances change. Thanks for the all the comments, they have been taken on board and appreciated :wink:

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Guest Jane Doe

I certainly wouldn't recommend people pairing off with their siblings but I think it's slighly different with flock birds :lol: There are different opinions, some people say it's fine some don't, unless they have experience I don't see how they can rubbish it, I think the problem comes if you bred inbreds from inbreds,I know of 3 different cockatiel younsters all from different brother and sister pairings that are perfectly normal, you wouldn't know they were inbred.

I think we are running ahead of ourseleves here, the potential owner hasn't even said that she wants them to breed, they are going to be pets, if they do mate and lay eggs the eggs can be swapped for dummies, easy as that! :)

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I dont agree with what has been said about inbreeding, but it's irrelevent right now.

 

I would get the dna done, and take it from there. Personally I wouldnt let a male and a female from the same clutch go to the same owner as you can never be too sure what will happen years down the line. Just my opinion.

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Although the term "Genetic Malformation " is the correct term ,not all "malformations are visual ,and some are fatal leading to a lot of dead in shell . And of course occasionally apparently normal but genetically weak offspring can be produced from brother to sister pairings .

As for the mention of `teils being "flock birds " that does not influence genetics as the strength or weakness of a flock depends on the variety of individuals within the flock and it`s size which can vary from season to season with flocks amalgamating and splitting as conditions vary . With captive birds this naturally can not happen as it is down to the discretion of the owner/breeder as to how the birds are paired . Incidentally I have seen some of the problems of brother/sister pairings with another flock bird the Budgie :wink:

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I am pretty sure George and Mildred were siblings, and it didn't put Mildred off acting like a tempress around George - I'm sure the only thing that meant no mating happened (at least, while I was looking) was that George couldn't quite work out what she meant ;)

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