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MadMudMob™

IMPORTANT - NEVER TRUST A CLIPPED BIRD OUTSIDE©

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I have just been informed that according to John Hayward (of the Lost & Found Register) ......

 

Posted Image50% of escaped parrots are clipped - 1/2 of those lostPosted Image

 

Do not trust a clip to keep your bird safe

 

= from the INFORMATION TOPICS© section: https://www.parrot-link.co.uk/forum/22-parrot-link-information-topics/

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Guest showgirl

Gosh that's a scary statistic..its a warning that can never be issued too many times though.

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I always thought a clipped bird couldn`t really fly so it could be caught easily .

 

so do most owners of clipped birds :shock: but a panic attack or a big gust of wind and away they go !

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Clipping one wing certainly unbalances a bird not only in flight but in general playing with toys and perching .... to me it is one of the cruellest clips.

Plus, it is no more effective in preventing determined flight than a clip top both wings.

 

For what it's worth here's a cut'n'paste of my own, personal, thought up by myself, opinion on clipping that I posted on a previous thread ....

 

"I've have used a progressive clip (see note of explanation below) as a last resort in curbing attacks by an adult knowing BF Amazon who caused the owner to need stitches frequently.

It worked where all else had failed and allowed the change of dominant order needed to allow this particular bird to stop his flying attacks long enough to learn new ways to cope with his dislikes and learn 'manners'.

 

To use a clip as an easy way to improve/hasten training in a new or non problem bird is, in my eyes, lazy, unnecessary, unkind and trust destroying. Chances are you may well end up with a bird who appears tame - but earning that bird's true trust will be much, much harder.

 

That is just my opinion and based on my experiences and observations - you, of course, will make your own mind up but ask yourself .........

if you're new family robbed you of your power of flight (your only safety mechanism for getting away from people and things you do not yet know let alone trust) would you like/trust/want to get to know them?

 

In general, I consider most clips to be a benefit to the owner and the detriment of the bird.

 

I would never trust even a fully clipped bird outdoors. This is my personal bee-in-bonnet as I KNOW of a bird I considered was cruelly/extremely clipped yet he took off in fright from his owner's shoulder. A bit of a breeze and a big dose of adrenalin and he was off.

 

If clipping is to be done, in my opinion, it must be done only to physically healthy adults and in a progressive and considerate way:

First 2 feathers each side removed (cleanly cut with sharp scissors after making sure it is not a blood/growing feather) and the bird allowed to adjust, then another and more adjustment time and then (if really needed) another. Flight can be tested during this to guesstimate (and it is a guess as you can't judge what power of flight they'll have in a panic) how much uplift the parrot can get.

 

A too severe too quick clip is CRUEL.

 

Clipping one side only is DANGEROUS as the poor bird has no balance. Not only in flight but whilst moving/climbing around a cage or hanging off toys (parroty play in other words).

 

 

Clipping to leave the 2 outmost feathers is an ACCIDENT waiting to happen as they are easily damaged and/or trapped in cage bars especially if the feathers that are clipped are cut more than a little short.

This type of clip is often said to be done for "Cosmetic" reasons ... translates in my mind as "So the owner won't feel too bad and the bird is still good to look at" but does offer the advantage of giving some protection to newly growing blood feathers.

 

A clip needs constant observation and maintenance as just one or two newly grown-in feathers can enable almost full flight again.

 

No bird that has EVER plucked or feather chewed should be clipped under ANY circumstances.

 

No bird should be clipped until adult enough to have mastered the art of flying, turning and landing.

 

Clipping baby/young birds can permanently affect their health as an adult, rob them of balance, mean that they never fully develop the necessary chest muscles and, even if they are allowed regrowth later, will be unable to rebuild these and/or learn flying skills.

 

Clipped birds need their owners to ensure that they 'fly' and keep their muscles well formed ... either by dipping a bird on your hand or running around to encourage flapping etc.

 

Here's some clipping threads which show what an emotive subject this is:

https://www.parrot-link.co.uk/topic/5711-no-subject/

 

(A progressive clip takes a little off a few feathers, allows a time of adjustment, and only then clips gradually more feathers and allows adjustment between each stage ...... to produce the result of a bird who can glide to a safe landing but not fly upwards indoors to launch an attack.

It is a kinder method than the cutting off of a huge portion of the wings in one go - the trauma of which has triggered plucking in more than a few cases and/or serious injuries as the bird crashes to the floor not knowing it can no longer fly)"

 

Small birds like Cockatiels would need ALL of their wing feathers butchered to prevent them flying and I would never under any circumstances recommend it on these little birds.

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Single wing clips are only supposed to be used for breeding males so that their females can escape if the male becomes violent ! ----- they are not reccomended for pet birds and especially not young birds as their have been many instances of broken breast bones in young birds with poorly developed breast muscles :!: :!:

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I`m sure a Parrot doesn`t just sit still while someone robs it of it`s flight. So that would ensure trust would take longer to form.

 

I feel so sorry for my parrot that is clipped, (before we got her) she trys tso hard and has to get around with her beak. :cry:

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Oscars previous owner had him clipped (one wing) on the advice from the breeder and that is when he started plucking. Over 3 years later, he still only has one wing with feathers on. I really can’t see why most people think it’s necessary, if you don’t want something flying around your home get a dog.

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So if you spend most of the time outside in the summer , and your bird is unclipped do you just lock him inside while we enjoy the sun outside? yes you can put them in an aviary, but i know bill would much rather be sitting with us chatting away and getting his head scratched.

In the winter he has his wings and flys about the office and the house, but someone only has toopen a door at the wrong time and he could be off!

How do places like Tropical birdland let theres fly freely?

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You could always build a big enough aviary where you could all sit and Bill could enjoy a fly in the fresh air aswell and be safe.

 

How do places like Tropical birdland let theres fly freely?

How many do they lose ?

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You could always build a big enough aviary where you could all sit and Bill could enjoy a fly in the fresh air aswell and be safe.

 

How do places like Tropical birdland let theres fly freely?

How many do they lose ?

I know of at least one, for certain.

 

I visited and enquired after a Triton 'too that had belonged to a friend of mine, several months after he went there. I was told he had often flown off into the nearby village and had failed to ever return, since a few months earlier. :(

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I don't think you can free fly parrots with as much of a degree of certainty as you can with birds of prey.

Probably because not much will prey on BOP! Parrots on the other hand will be chased by just about anything!

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I don't think you can free fly parrots with as much of a degree of certainty as you can with birds of prey.

Probably because not much will prey on BOP! Parrots on the other hand will be chased by just about anything!

 

Probably, but you control the weight of birds of prey in order to fly them properly which is easier to do because they are carnivores. Harder to do well herbivores. I have seen harris hawks mobbed by gulls before so its swings and round abouts.

 

 

you know my office??

Nah but if youve got a doorway you can build an aviary over it without to much difficulty

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